Creepy Crawly Brain Reorganization

brain synapses

The brain is vast and complex. Neurons, synapses, fifty thousand miles of wiring, and billions of nerve cells. You would expect an organ so complicated would require hyper-vigilant attention to keep it from malfunctioning. On the contrary, the brain works fine with the basics: good food, sleep, and exercise. But what if something is amiss with the brain?  What do you do if you are a parent and have a child with ADD, ADHD, or a developmental delay?  How do you sort through all the treatment options, advice, and modes of therapy?  Though none of my sons have any significant developmental delay, I recently reviewed a  DVD on childhood brain development by the Family Life Center located in Pennsylvania.

Guest Speaker

The presentation was a videotaped lecture by Matthew Newell, director of the center.  Mr. Newell zipped through child brain development from infancy on and then discussed his belief in the ability of the brain to be repaired through his

physiology vs pathology

Integrative/Chiropractic/Cranial Sacral/Fascia/Digestive Treatment approach. He uses Crawl therapy (no matter what the child’s age) which may require hours of crawling

crawling babya day for “neurological reorganization”.

Besides the crawling, and creeping around the house he has many more treatments which he testifies will help disorganized brains to reorganize, thus improving the developmental delays and child’s progress.

Heavy metal detox, smell therapy, eliminating electromagnetic field exposure, and eating only food that is natural and organic.  Read my review in its entirety, and tell me what you think.  Is this truth with scientific research to validate Mr. Newell’s practices, or is having kids who already know how to ambulate crawl for hours a day to fix their brains seem….

strange?

Randall

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Kathy

I've been a Family Nurse Practitioner since 1991. My most memorable patient was Meinhardt Raabe, the Munchkin Coroner from the Wizard of Oz. I now practice in Addiction Medicine and recently published Hepatitis C Quick Start: A guide for the clinician.

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