The Secrets of People Who Never Get Sick

Wouldn’t it be wonderful to never get sick – no more bronchitis, stomach bug, or other nasty viruses? Close to $40 billion a year is spent treating the common cold. But what if there was a simple solution to avoid sickness? Imagine how much more you could do and the money you’d save if you never got sick. In his book The Secrets of People Who Never Get Sick, Gene Stone found a sampling of everyday people who claimed to never get ill. 25 healthy living “secrets”, some unique, others well known. Meet Patricia, a native New Yorker who eats dirt, and Phil, a teacher who claims detoxification cured his cancer. Take a peek into the lives of regular people, who do a little something extra – eat fresh garlic, consume only plant based foods, take probiotics, make a habit of napping. They all swear their routine keeps them healthy. Will their tips work for you? Read the full review and find the “secret” website here.

My Preceptor is Dead

Humpback whale tail by Captain Budd Christman

The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires. -William Arthur Ward

He was my preceptor, my collaborator, my children’s pediatrician, and my friend. He died August 26th, 2012 – sudden death on a beautiful August morning. 55, active, non-smoker, world traveler, patient advocate, and deliverer of the kind of care you would want for yourself and the world. I heard the news from an email:

“I got a call this morning. Jay passed away yesterday while working at Urgent Care.  I’m still in shock.  He was so healthy and only ate what was good for you…I saw him in July. He looked great.  Such a shock. Take care and this proves that life is too short.”

Passed away. I kept reading them over in unbelief. Then I stared at them, thinking maybe I could will the words away. I heard he was cremated. It wasn’t until a week later when I stepped inside the funeral home and saw the memorials – his favorite puffin tie, high-school yearbook, awards, and larger than life photograph of his robust, smiling face. It was true, he was gone, and I sobbed. Jay had a huge impact on the Nurse Practitioner that I grew to be. As I formed, he gently led me like a father, and slowly let me take my own shape – finding my own way through diagnosing and delivering care to our patients. He game me his pearls. Amoxicillin for smokers. Erythromycin for my-cough-plasma. Brand Tylenol only. Worst Strept throat think Mono. Verify allergies. Save ears for last. Suspension not solution. Maltsupex. 3-day food diary. OM? Remove the wax to see the drum. Toilet paper roll=cheap spacer. Always order HCG despite claim “impossible”. Paps: touch thigh before nether regions. Pharmacist is your friend. Wait one year before RX new drugs. Use mom’s lap for clingers. Be nice, stay humble, eat well, and enjoy life.

Twenty years ago, I was privileged to have trained with him, honored to have worked alongside him, and blessed to have known him. Today’s Nurse Practitioner students are rarely precepted by MD’s. What a shame. Removing them from our education only widens the division of our professions. Perhaps if we took another look at how things used to be we would see ourselves as players on the same team, not separate entities who are different in their approach to patient care. I see no difference. APN’s in training: if you have a chance to precept with a Family Practice Doc, consider yourself one of the lucky ones. My preceptor has died, a life gone too soon, and the loss is devastating.